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Fish News ... July 17, 2014
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Cobia fishing remains excellent with both chumming and sight-fishing producing fish. There are a lot of small to medium sized cobia being caught. Finding bigger cobia has been more of a challenge. Big red drum continue to be caught on the shoals near the mouth of the bay and along the Eastern Shore seaside by angler targeting them. They are also being caught by anglers targeting cobia and flounder. There are some nice flounder beingFish image 1 17jul14caught at the CBBT and the York River continues to produce some nice flounder. It is time for the Cell/buoy 42 area flounder bite to start heating up. Big sheepshead are being caught at the CBBT. Spadefish can be found at the CBBT and at the Chesapeake Light Tower and over wrecks in that area. Spanish mackerel are being caught along the oceanfront. Spanish to over 6 pounds were caught this week. Croaker fishing is good up in the rivers and good number of medium-sized spot are also being caught. Puppy drum are still being caught on the flats and in the inlets. Amberjack are at the southern towers. Offshore, it has been mostly white marlin and dolphin. Decent numbers of blue marlin are around. Some wahoo and mako sharks are being caught. What has been lacking is tuna. Some giant bluefin tuna rolled through ahead of the hurricane but they seem to have moved on north now. There are still some yellowfin and bigeye tuna being caught at the Washington Canyon. Charles Southall will be the speaker at the July 15 meeting of the PSWSFA. His topic will be Inshore Wreck Fishing. Club tournaments: The PSWSFA Triple Threat (Red Drum, Black Drum, Cobia) Tournament will end on July 31. The Don Forman Cobia Tournament will run the entire month of August. The free Youth and Ladies Croaker and Flounder Tournament will begin on July 12 and run through July 27 when there will be club picnic and awards ceremony at Dare Marina, 6 PM. Report from Martin Freed and Ruta Vaskys- With apologies to Bobby Daren, "Oh, the shark, babe, has such teeth, dear. And it shows them pearly white." Indeed! That was demonstrated to Martin yesterday. In fact, he figured out that they are not only white but ivory razor blades. Martin has handled thousands of sharks in his life and and though punctured by spiny dogfish a few times, had never been bitten. That changed yesterday as he was attempting to release an ungrateful Chondrichthyes.

Fish image 2 17jul14He was holding it by the stem to the tail about to throw it overboard when the 15 pound fish flipped and grabbed his savior's thigh. Martin was very indignant with this lack of gratitude. The blacktip figured it was payment for the hole in his mouth and felt very satisfied while bragging about the incident as he rejoined the myriads of his brethren swimming the depths beneath the SeaWife. The injury was of no consequence and Martin spent the rest of the day pulling in and releasing an estimated 30 sharks. The bathing queen, Ruta, lay across the front deck reading. Ruta is a catch and fillet woman and since we could only keep two sharks, she felt she'd let Martin do the honors of catch and release. Every so often she'd feel bad and offer to reel one in. We caught four different species: Blacktip (which by the way are incredible fighters with searing runs and aerobatics), sandbar, one species that is yet to be identified (the largest we reeled in estimated 40 pounds), and Atlantic sharpnose. The regs relating to sharks are very complicated and the species difficult to ID. Dreaming of BBQ shark steaks and shark fin soup, we were able to keep only the two Atlantic sharpnose. Besides a few rays and a one pound bluefish, that's all we caught while chumming for cobia. Figures: The cobia fishing was great until the day we finally got our stuff together to launch the boat. Oh well, that's fishing. We did try at the 4th Island for a while in an attempt to get a sheepshead. There must have been at least 25 boats there. Most were trying for flounder and few for spadefish. In two hours we did not see anyone land a fish except for a few medium croaker. However, we discovered that there are a lot of pigfish and a few blowfish close to the rocks. As they are among our favorites to eat, we changed over to small hooks and caught some. Though the lack of cobia was a disappointment, it was a fabulous day. The weather was brilliant. We saw several pods of dolphins, a number of petrols and the usual assortment of seagulls. It was so wonderful being out on the water again.

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